Singer/songwriter Sam Tieger came of age knowing a couple of solid facts: She wanted to pursue her passion for singing and writing songs, and that John Lennon was a family member.

Sam grew up in a small suburb in Ohio near Cincinnati.  She remembers as a child running past the portrait of Lennon that was hung in the hallway of her home, sitting down under it to play and generally just accepting that the reason it was there was because he was a relative.

She finally learned that Lennon was NOT a family member but her house was always filled with music, a backdrop provided by her parents who taught her about the great masters: McCartney, Dylan, Mitchell, etc.

As she grew and her love of music was solidified, she started to have big dreams of her own. As a teenager in the early 2000’s, Sam and her friends followed the music and beats of her generation of artists.  And after convincing her parents at the tender age of 13 to take her and her friends to see a young Taylor Swift, Sam’s life was about to take another turn.

“She was on her first tour or something, playing at a Wal-Mart. Seems funny now, of course, but after seeing her at that show, I knew I wanted to do exactly what she was doing.  I wanted to be up there, singing my songs, I knew it was my future.” When Sam was 15, she entered the studio to record her first demo, “The feeling of taking a song that I wrote in my living room and bringing it to life was like nothing I’d ever experienced up to that moment.  It was magical.”

As she came into her own as a young adult off to college, Sam brought her songs with her to Raleigh/Durham, NC and during the day would study the romance languages and in the evening, play at local clubs and bars to very grateful audiences.

“At first it was just my friends coming down to have a few beers and support me and then it became more of like, you know, a regular thing that I was there.  I learned so much from all of the other musicians that would play.  I opened for metal bands, R&B acts and other singer songwriters like me and it just made me that much more determined.”

As Sam has grown into a young, beautiful, intelligent and gifted artist, she pursued a life in Nashville after Raleigh where she worked with world renowned songwriters on honing her craft and producer Norbert Putnam best known for his work with Jimmy Buffett and Joan Baez, among others.

“Co-writing really got me to a place where I wasn’t afraid of being quirky or testing out new types of songs. Working with such experienced artists really lead me to embrace and experiment with more eclectic styles,” adds Sam.

After a couple of years in Nashville, Sam has come full circle and returned to her native city Cincinnati and will be putting out new songs channeling all that she has seen and experienced. “It feels great to be back in Cincinnati and I’m so excited about this next step. I feel lucky to have found something I’m so passionate about and to be able pursue my dream,” says Sam.

Sam will be releasing her first new track “Back Together Again,” and that will be the beginning of the roll out of several of her new songs.  “I want fans to go on this journey with me, so as I develop as an artist, they can see it happening and they can share their own journeys with me through social media, emails, etc.  My generation is all about communication and I look forward to adding my voice to that as soon as possible.”

What do you say is your signature sound/style?

My signature sound is a blend of musical elements from the singer-songwriter and pop genres. I write all of my songs on acoustic guitar, but then I like to experiment with bigger, pop sounds in the studio.

What is your mantra as you proceed in your career? 

Stay true to who you are, ALWAYS. In the past people have tried to change things about my sound or my style because they thought it might help me succeed, but not listening to that and staying true to myself in the studio and on stage has led to the best possible outcome. The best thing any artist can do is use what is unique about them to their advantage.

Which do you prefer, recording or live shows? 

They’re hard to compare, and there are amazing qualities about both, but there’s something about being in the studio that has always been magical for me. The creative collaboration between artists and producers is so cool, and most of the time when I go into the studio picturing how a song is going to sound, I go home with something even better.

The producers that I’ve worked with have had very unique musical backgrounds and have had a lot of amazing ideas to bring to the table. The songs that I’ve written are what I’m most proud of, and hearing them come to life in the studio is like nothing I’ve ever experienced before.

Who is your audience and who do you think they should be?

I write songs purely based on what I’m going through, what my friends are going through, and what the characters of my favorite TV shows are going through 🙂 I think my main audience so far is people around my age, going through the craziness of being in your early 20s.

However, I think that because my songs are about universal topics like life and love, people of younger and older age groups will be able to relate to my lyrics as well. 

What is the point in which you throw down the gauntlet or give up and just do music for fun?

I try to really live in the present and not think that I’ll have to get to a point where I’d just do it for fun. This is what I’ve always wanted to do, and I’m so passionate about it that I can’t see my life going in a different direction.


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Millennial Staff


MiLLENNiAL is a lifestyle magazine profiling those who are shaping the world we experience. From business innovation and career strategy to sustainable health and cultural disruptors, MiLLENNiAL shines the light on the young change makers of the world.

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