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Do Miniature Horses Make Good Companions?

Millennial Magazine - miniature horses

Horses are classified as livestock by some, but they are also considered companion animals by others, especially if they are maintained for leisure purposes. Many people think of miniature horses as pets since they are between 34 and 38 inches tall. Thus, in this article, we will try to present to you how such a horse can be a good companion for you.

Why Have One?

A miniature horse is an excellent alternative to a full-sized horse for owners with limited space. They are often easier to teach, have a higher level of friendliness, and require less maintenance than larger horses. Nevertheless, these lovely smallest horse breeds require the same level of attention as full-grown horses, and their extended lifespans make them a significant undertaking. They are often kind and sociable with everyone they meet, making them excellent companion animals for children, families, and even other farm animals.

Miniature horses make excellent companion animals because they are kind, gentle, playful, obedient, sociable, and curious. They are renowned to be bright, quick learners, obedient, and easygoing animals. All tiny horses, however, are unique, and some exhibit the same “quirks” as their larger counterparts, such as biting, defiance, and being stubborn and self-reliant.

You Need to Take Care of Them

If you’re thinking about getting a tiny horse as a pet, talk to a large animal veterinarian about making sure the horse has enough space and shelter. You should also learn about standard necessities for having a miniature horse, such as immunizations, dental care, foot care, and nutrition. Miniature horses are just as demanding to care for as full-sized horses, so make sure you’re up for the challenge.

The only difference between miniature and full-sized horses in terms of general care and upkeep is their size. All equines receive the same vaccinations, dental treatment, foot care, nutrition, and housing. The same illnesses and disorders affect miniature horses as they do full-sized horses. Because they are physically identical to full-sized horses, they are at risk for lameness, gastrointestinal problems, respiratory problems, and other health difficulties.

Moreover, they have a few characteristics that might pose problems that full-sized horses do not. Miniature horses like to eat things that larger horses wouldn’t, such as boulders, pine shavings, and a lot of sand. They also have a proclivity for being “easy-keepers,” which means they can gain weight quickly on high-calorie diets. Miniature horses have a reduced caloric need due to their tiny stature. Owners may overfeed them inadvertently, which may easily lead to obesity.

Housing

In order for your miniature horse to have enough area to play, exercise, and forage, you’ll need at least an acre of property. This should be a fenced-in area with ample grazing and foraging room to keep them secure from attackers. It will need to be larger if you have more than one horse or if the area is shared with other animals.

If you currently have a horse barn, a standard horse stall may be converted to a small one. Simply replace the door and adjust the food and clean water bucket hooks to a mini’s level. Make certain, however, that the horse’s stall is designed exclusively for a miniature horse. To keep the horse healthy, it should have short walls so the animal can look over and have enough air.

Miniature Horses are safer when kept away from full-size horses due to their small stature. If a large horse starts playing and kicking, it might seriously damage a Mini. If you have both large and little breeds, make sure your Mini has his own pasture for protection.

How to Approach Them?

Even though miniature horses are little, they may nevertheless hurt you with their kicks and fangs. You should approach horses in a way that lets them know you’re approaching, just like you do with any other animal. As you approach, make a noise to alert them that you are approaching. You can come near a horse from the side and touch it, but you should never approach it from behind.

Nutrition

All horses, especially miniatures, require high-quality hay or fodder, which should account for the bulk of their entire diet. To avoid laminitis, you should only allow your mini restricted access to early spring pastures. Grain can also help your mini stay in shape, but too much might cause colic and weight problems. Mineral salts, such as trace mineral salts, are also necessary to offer minerals to your miniature horses. In warmer weather, trace mineral salts can help replace electrolytes and encourage your mini ones to drink more water, which can help prevent colic.

If you’re thinking about getting a tiny horse as a pet, talk to a veterinarian about making sure the horse has enough space and shelter. You should also learn about basic necessities for owning a miniature horse, such as immunizations, dental care, hoof care, and nutrition. Miniature horses are just as demanding to care for as full-sized horses, so make sure you’re up for the challenge.

What do you think?

Written by Hanna Hayda

Hanna Hayda is an avid blogger about creating the perfect home environment for your family. From cooking to home improvement, Hanna and her husband share tips and tricks as weekend warriors from the Pacific Northwest.

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